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Matches 101 to 133 of 133

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101 Was elected by the narrow margin of 71 to 68 over his vice-president and
successor Thomas Jefferson. Presided from 1797 to 1801. Was the first
president to live in Washington, D.C. Died on the same day a few hours
after Thomas Jefferson. Was responsible for appointing George Washington
Commander-in-Chief of the Army. Insisted that Thomas Jefferson write the
draft for the declaration of independence. 
Adams, John (I2113)
 
102 Was elected in 1800 by 73 electoral votes versus 73 for Aaron Burr and 65 for
his predecessor John Adams. Electors had two votes back then. In 1804 he
defeated Charley Pinckney by 162 to 14 electoral votes. Served two terms
from 1801 to 1809. During his first term Aaron Burr served as vice-president,
during his second George Clinton. Under Jefferson the Louisiana Purchase was
made, the biggest land bargain in history; Congress approved it and transfer
of ownership from France completed at New Orleans on Dec. 20, 1803. 
Jefferson, Thomas (I2143)
 
103 Was elected in 1808 by 122 to 47 electoral votes over Charles Pinckney. Was
reelected in 1812 by 128 to 89 electoral votes over De Witt Clinton. During
his first term 1809-1812 George Clinton served as vice-president; during his
second 1813-1814 Elbridge Gerry. From 1814 to 1817 the speaker of the House
of Representatives served as vice-president. 
Madison, James (I2172)
 
104 Was elected in 1816 by 183 to 34 electoral votes over Rufus King. Reelected
in 1820 by 231 to 1 electoral votes over John Quincy Adams, his successor.
During both terms Daniel D. Tompkins served as vice-president. Was the first
president to take the oath on a raised portico in front of the Capitol. The
dissenter in the 1820 election thought only George Washington deserved to be
unanimously elected. Was the third president to die on the Fourth of July. 
Monroe, James (I2189)
 
105 Was elected in 1824 by a popular vote of 108,740 and an electoral vote of 84.
Andrew Jackson - his successor - hat garnerd 153,544 popular and 99 electoral
votes. However, no candidate had a majority, and election was decided in the
House of Representatives. During his single term 1825-1829 John C. Calhoun
served as his vice-president. Was elected in 1830 as Representative for
Massachusetts ans served 17 years in Congress. 
Adams, John Quincy (I2114)
 
106 Was elected in 1840 over his predecessor Martin Van Buren by a popular vote of
1,274,624 to 1,127,781 and an electoral vote of 234 to 60. Chose as vice-
president John Tyler, who succeeded him after a single month in office. Was
the oldest man to be elected president, the first to die in office, and served
the shortest time as president. 
Harrison, William Henry (I1475)
 
107 Was elected in 1856 over John C. Fr?mont and Millard Fillmore by a popular
vote of 1,832,955 to 1,339,932 and 871,731 and an electoral vote of 174 to
114 and 8. John C. Breckinridge served as his vice-president. In 1819, as a
young and successful lawyer, Buchanan fell in love with Anne Coleman, daughter
of a Lancaster millionaire. Her parents disapproved. Because of rumors Anne
broke the engagement. She died in December of that same year. Buchanan vowed
never to marry. Called "Old Buck". 
Buchanan, James (I1926)
 
108 Was elected in 1868 over Horatio Seymour by a popular vote of 3,013,421 to
2,706,829 and an electoral vote of 214 to 80. Won reelection in 1872 by votes
of 3,596,745 to 2,843,446 and 286 to 0 over Horace Greeley. Became known in
1862 as "Unconditional Surrender Grant". In 1864, Lt. General Grant was given
command of the northern army; accepted General Lee's surrender at Appomattox. 
Grant, (Hiram) Ulysses Simpson (I1987)
 
109 Was elected over Henry Clay by a popular vote of 1,338,464 to 1,300,097 and an
electoral vote of 170 to 105. George M. Dallas served as his vice-president.
Occasionally called "Little Hickory". During his presidency the USA grew by
800,000 square miles, including California, New Mexico, Arizona and Texas;
the boundaries between Canada and the USA were set where they are today. Polk
did not seek a second term and, worn out from his hard work, died three months
after leaving office. 
Polk, James Knox (I1876)
 
110 Was elected over John Quincy Adams by a popular vote of 647,286 to 508,064
and an electoral vote of 178 to 83. Was reelected 1832 over Henry Clay by a
popular vote of 687,502 to 530,189 and an electoral vote of 219 to 49. During
his first term 1829-1832 John C. Calhoun served as vice-president, during his
second 1833-1837 his successor Martin Van Buren. Called "Old Hickory". 
Jackson, Andrew (I2207)
 
111 Was elected without opponent by 69 electoral votes. Was in office from
1789 to 1797 (two terms). His vice-president was his successor John Adams.
Refused to run for a third term and - thereby - inofficially instituted the
2-term rule for american presidents, the only exception being Franklin Delano
Roosevelt. 
Washington, George (I406)
 
112 Was killed in a railroad accident. Pierce, Benjamin (I1950)
 
113 Was married 5 times. Washington, Samuel (I501)
 
114 Was minister of the First Baptist Church at Newport, RI. Emigrated from
Didsbury, Lancashire, England to Newport in 1630. 
Holmes, Obadiah (I390)
 
115 Was never elected to office. Succeeded Zachary Taylor upon his death in 1850.
Ran again unsuccessfully for the presidency in 1856. 
FILLMORE, Millard (I2259)
 
116 Was never elected to office; attained the presidency through the death of his
predecessor William Henry Harrison, whose vice-president he was. Samuel L.
Southard, president pro tempore of the Senate served as his vice-president. 
Tyler, John (I1685)
 
117 Was never elected; became president upon the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.
Was in office 1865-1869. Is the only man in american history to attain all 4
kinds of public office - legislative, judicial, military, and executive - and
was both Vice-President and President, yet he had no formal schooling. He was
a tailor by trade, and his wife taught him to read and write. Only president
to be impeached, but acquitted. 
Johnson, Andrew (I1544)
 
118 Was never elected; succeeded James A. Garfield after his death following
assassination 80 days earlier. His vice-presidents were Thomas F. Bayard,
David Davis, and George F. Edmunds, all Presidents per tempore of the Senat.
Was not nominated by his party in 1884. 
Arthur, Chester Alan (I1967)
 
119 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Bush, George Herbert Walker (I698)
 
120 William Jefferson Blythe II was named for an uncle. BLYTHE, II. William Jefferson (I9)
 
121 Won the 1852 election over Winfield Scott by a popular vote of 1,601,117 to
1,385,453 and an electoral vote of 254 to 42. William R. King was his vice-
president. Was the only president to complete his term without making any
changes in his Cabinet. 
Pierce, Franklin (I1946)
 
122 Won the 1860 election over the two democratic candidates Stephen A. Douglas
and John C. Breckinridge by a popular vote of 1,865,593 to 1,382,713 and
848,356 and an electoral vote of 180 to 12 and 72. Was reelected in 1864 over
George B. McClellan by votes of 2,206,938 to 1,803,787 and 212 to 21. Hannibal
Hamlin served as vice-president during his first term 1861-1865, Andrew
Johnson during his second term until his assassination by John Wilkes Booth
on Good Friday, April 14, 1865 at Ford's Theater. Called "Honest Abe". 
Lincoln, Abraham (I327)
 
123 Won the 1880 election over Winfield S. Hancock by a popular vote of 4,453,295
to 4,414,082 and an electoral vote of 214 to 155. Chester A. Arthur became
his vice-president and successor upon his murder. Was the last president to
have been born in a log cabin, the fourth president to die in office, and the
second to be assassinated (by Guiteau). 
Garfield, James Abram (I2010)
 
124 Won the 1884 election over James G. Blaine by a popular vote of 4,879,507 to
4,850,293 and an electoral vote of 219 to 182. Lost the 1888 election to
Bejamin Harrison, but won again in 1892 over Harrison and James Weaver by
votes of 5,555,426 to 5,182,690 and 1,029,846, and 277 to 145 and 22. Was the
only president to married in the White House, and the only president to be
elected to non-consecutive terms. 
Cleveland, Grover (Stephen) (I1735)
 
125 Won the 1888 electoral vote by 233 to 168 for his predecessor and successor
Grover Cleveland, even though Cleveland had won the popular vote by 5,537,857
to 5,447,129. Lost the 1892 election to Cleveland. Chose Levi P. Morton to
be his vice-president. 
Harrison, Benjamin (I1476)
 
126 Won the 1896 and 1900 elections over William J. Bryan by popular votes of
7,102,246 to 6,492,559 and 7,218,491 to 6,356,734 and electoral votes of 271
to 176 and 292 to 155. Shortly after his second inauguration, he was assassi-
nated by Czolgosz. During his first term Garret A. Hobart served as his vice-
president, during his second his successor Theodor Roosevelt. 
McKinley, William (I2056)
 
127 Won the 1920 election - the first in which women participated - over James M.
Cox and Eugene V. Debs by a popular vote of 16,143,407 to 9,130,328 and
919,799, and an electoral vote of 404 to 127 and 0. Chose as vice-president
his successor Calvin Coolidge. 
Harding, Warren Gamaliel (I2095)
 
128 Won the 1928 election over Alfred E. Smith by a popular vote of 21,391,993 to
15,016,169 and an electoral vote of 444 to 87, but lost the 1932 election to
Fraklin Roosevelt. Charles Curtis served as his vice-president. The first
president born west of the Mississippi River. During his term the great
depression of 1929 happened, and he was largely blamed for its consequences. 
Hoover, Herbert Clark (I1818)
 
129 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Carter, Jr. James Earl (Jimmy) (I1671)
 
130 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. REAGAN, Ronald Wilson (I89)
 
131 Won the close 1960 election over then vice-president Richard Nixon by a
popular vote of 34,226,731 to 34,108,157 and an electoral vote of 303 to 219
(14 democratic electors and one republican elector voted for Virginia Senator
Harry F. Byrd). Was succeeded by his vice-president Lyndon B. Johnson. Well
remembered is the sentence "... ask not what your country can do for you - ask
what you can do for your country" in his inaugural speech. 
Kennedy, John Fitzgerald (I1604)
 
132 Won the most memorable and controversial election in 1876 over Samuel J.
Tilden. Tilden won the popular vote by 4,284,020 to 4,036,572, but Hayes won
the electoral vote by the smallest possible margin of 185 to 184. William A.
Wheeler was his vice-president. Hayes declined to run for a second term. 
Hayes, Rutherford Birchard (I2034)
 
133 Won the Republican Nomination upon Roosevelts recommendation. Won the 1908
election over William J. Bryan by a popular vote of 7,675,320 to 6,412,294
and an electoral vote of 321 to 162. James S. Sherman was his vice-president.
On June 30, 1921 he became Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Because of
his weight of 332 pounds he was nich-named "Big Bill". 
Taft, William Howard (I2075)
 

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